Into the Deep

Into the Deep

I really want to know that I did my absolutely best in staying awake, in being accurate, in remembering all the lessons.

“A deep sea voyage, I would say is being away from the sight of land for any amount of days. It’s not something that you’re used to. Even if you trained, and maybe you’ve only gone inter-island, yeah, there’s something very different about losing sight of island. And for some people, like, I just kind of like, wow out at deep-sea, but for some it can be a scary experienced. I think just your body adjusting to a different environment, living on the water,  you’re always moving, you’re almost always wet, and just the showering, the using the bathroom, even the diet. Everything is just a little different. So your body needs to make those adjustments.” said veteran navigator Kaʻiulani Murphy. “I asked a couple people this question, ʻWhat if I’m really bad on the ocean? What if I just can’t pull it together?ʻ This is a huge risk in that I’ve never been on a deep-sea voyage. There’s so much to learn. What if I get seasick all four years of the voyage. I really want to know that I did my absolutely best in staying awake, in being accurate, in remembering all the lessons and all the studying,” said apprentice navigator Lehua Kamalu.

ʻŌiwi TV reaches across generations, socio-economic statuses, and geographic locations as the sole media venue where the Hawaiian language, culture and perspective thrive. Through Digital Channel 326, ʻŌiwi TV reaches over 220,000 households across the entire State via Oceanic Time Warner Cable’s network. Through its website, mobile, and social media venues, ʻŌiwi TV is reaching Hawaiians everywhere and engaging a generation of Hawaiians that expect to access anything and everything from anywhere at anytime.

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.